The Damnable Cabs – ‘All Night Long’

Independent Spotlight is a continuing series on Stewart’s blog. The series revolves around independent artists and bands sending their music to Brett to review. No band is promised a positive review, and all music is reviewed honestly in an effort to better independent music.

In this evening’s edition of the Independent Spotlight, we’re going to explore the music of The Damnable Cads, a four-piece rock outfit that describes themselves as a “cadre of arrogants swine who travel the world swilling beer and keeping the neighbors up late.” They acknowledge their tongue-in-cheek style, combining influence from the likes of glam rock icon T. Rex and bands from the turn of the century such as Oasis. They’ve got a handful of new tunes to listen to on SoundCloud. Let’s dig right into them!

The Damnable Cads have one hell of a SoundCloud presence, boasting at least seventy thousand spins on each song. The first of those tunes is ‘Little Dreamer,’ a soft-spoken, melodic song that explores infectious choruses, lo-fi acoustics, and excellent guitar riffs. At times, the vocal mix does fall down into the instrumentation. If I wasn’t in an actual studio, but instead spinning the song in Apple earbuds or the like, this would prove a bit problematic. That said, the lo-fi style of ‘Little Dreamer’ is also chock-full of personality.

‘Drive Me Wild’ continues that trend of reverberated, semi-lo-fi style. I love the comradery with the band – you can hear the other three crooning in the background and the instrumentation bounces around between the performers quite well. There’s a chemistry exhibited beautifully in the middle section of ‘Drive Me Wild.’

‘All Night Long,’ the title track of the record, reminds me heavily of The Clash. The pop-infused handclapping, the punchy vocal delivery, and lyrical rebelliousness are all akin to the early era of punk rock. (‘All Night Long’ is even reminiscent of the Ramones.) I dig how these songs are short, wham, bam, thank you, ma’am tracks. They don’t need to be long with self-indulgent soloing or jamming.

‘She’s A Dreamer’ walks the line between contemporary suaveness and classic musings. It’s the kind of song you’d hear Joe Walsh follow up ‘Rocky Mountain Way’ with in 1974. The best production of the record, ‘C’mon Girl,’ then follows. ‘C’mon Girl’ has a much sharper vocal mix, which is matched by some of the stronger performances on the album, too. Out of the six outings, ‘C’mon Girl’ feels the most complete.

‘Not Yet’ is a fantastic rocker to close out the album, culminating some of the sound quality of ‘C’mon Girl’ and the comradery of ‘Drive Me Wild.’ It’s also got some of the best guitar on the album. Thus, the record exhibits some excellent potential on behalf of The Damnable Cads. They don’t take themselves too seriously, and as a result, the carefree sonic experience that flows out of their record is a memorable one. (Even if some of the vocal mixes do falter. That’s the largest issue of the record, but a forgivable one.)

Connect with them online below!

https://soundcloud.com/the-damnable-cads

http://thedamnablecads.com/

Jamie Alimorad – ‘Rock Me To Heaven’

Independent Spotlight is a continuing series on Stewart’s blog. The series revolves around independent artists and bands sending their music to Brett to review. No band is promised a positive review, and all music is reviewed honestly in an effort to better independent music.

In this edition of the Independent Spotlight, we’re going to be shining our gaze on an upcoming indie artist, Jamie Alimorad, and his new tune, ‘Rock Me To Heaven.’ The new track has been produced and written by Grammy-nominated Gino Vannelli, and it’s also the first insight into a full album from the collaboration due out later this year. Thus, it has all the makings of a very promising endeavor. Is it one, though? Let’s find out.

‘Rock Me To Heaven’ is a well-executed jaunt through ballad penning and delivery. It’s a lovely ode to a significant other that isn’t ostentatiously produced or overly kitschy. That’s very important, difficult territory to navigate. I’d argue Alimorad and Vannelli do so quite tactfully. There isn’t a moment of ‘Rock Me To Heaven’ that feels too trope-driven, unlike most indie soft rock ballads of its kind.

Part of that success is the sincerity behind Alimorad’s performance. He’s got a great voice that’s accentuated beautifully by a female vocalist on the latter half of the piece. He doesn’t attempt to ‘own’ the landscape of the song. Rather, he occupies it in harmony pretty elegantly with the instrumentation. This adds to the sincerity, especially in the final moments as the vocal melodies bounce off one another superbly.

From a production stance, ‘Rock Me To Heaven’ doesn’t do anything new, but it also doesn’t do anything wrong. It’s simplistic, employing instrumentation and reverberated soundscapes you’d expect from this sort of tune. That’s not a bad thing at all. It isn’t a surprising track, but it’s not supposed to be. It’s designed to be soothing and soft. It does that very well, and the brevity of the production and performance helps achieve that effect.

‘Rock Me To Heaven’ is a promising indication of the full album later this year being something worth keeping tabs on. I’m not sure if you can have a full record of this style, though, so I’m intrigued as to how Vannelli will push Alimorad forward into new territory throughout the collection. Spin the song on SoundCloud now!

https://soundcloud.com/jamie-alimorad/rock-me-to-heaven

Website: http://jamiealimorad.com

Facebook: http://facebook.com/jamiealimorad

Twitter: http://twitter.com/JamieAlimorad

Instagram: http://instagram.com/jamiealimorad

Bandcamp: http://jamiealimorad.bandcamp.com

Moxie Kicks – ‘Double Down’

Independent Spotlight is a continuing series on Stewart’s blog. The series revolves around independent artists and bands sending their music to Brett to review. No band is promised a positive review, and all music is reviewed honestly in an effort to better independent music.

In this morning’s Independent Spotlight, we’re going to be shining our gaze on an upcoming indie rock outfit from London – Moxie Kicks. The band has been enjoying a meteoric rise of sorts in the UK, having been lauded by Graham Norton and acclaimed producer Chris Potter, who worked with The Stones, U2, and Blur. (“Definitely a break out band for 2016,” he said.) Their new EP is ‘Double Down,’ and it’s due out April 8. Let’s dig right into it.

Moxie Kicks immediately draws to mind different pop rock outfits from England in the last decade and a half: the Wombats, the Kooks, perhaps even Oasis. The title track of the EP is a really sharply produced effort with tight harmonies, slick lead vocals, thunderous percussion, and a cataclysmic finale. It makes a bold statement right out of the gate. Is it lyrically a bit baseless? Perhaps. Is it very enjoyable? Definitely.

‘So Alive,’ while not immediately as catchy as its predecessor, may be a better song. It allows the band to explore some more interesting lyricism. ‘Double Down’ hits you in the face with a wham, bam, thank you, ma’am mentality. ‘So Alive’ is more subtle and it doesn’t necessarily hit you over the head with the same chorus like ‘Double Down.’

The instrumentation of ‘Rain’ may be my favorite of the record. The band’s got one hell of a drummer. He’s always in step, his fills are exceptional, and he’s the motor turning the machine. The drowned-out bridge toward the latter half of the song is eerily wonderful, too. ‘Without A Sound’ has some of the finer atmosphere, though, really toying with its soundscape’s boundaries to excellent effect.

Moxie Kicks are just as promising as people like Chris Potter claim they are. They’re also very poppy. That means you can’t get on their roller coaster looking for immense depth to your lyricism. It’s fun, catchy, feel-good music that I’m sure gets crowds moving at shows. It’s good to work out to, to dance to, or to jive to when you’re not looking for music that’s too serious or dark.

Follow Moxie Kicks online below and pre-orders for ‘Double Down’ go live March 29. The album drops April 5! They’ll be touring Europe, China, the Philippines, and possibly the US and Canada this year.

https://www.facebook.com/MoxieKicks/

@MoxieKicks on Twitter

www.moxiekicks.com

Underlined Passages – ‘The Fantastic Quest’

Independent Spotlight is a continuing series on Stewart’s blog. The series revolves around independent artists and bands sending their music to Brett to review. No band is promised a positive review, and all music is reviewed honestly in an effort to better independent music.

In this edition of the Independent Spotlight, we’re going to be digging into a band that we touched on almost exactly a year ago today – Underlined Passages. Their spring 2015 effort was one of finer endeavors of the season, and I lauded it pretty heavily for its pop sensibility and exceptional production. Now, the band is back with their new effort due out April 5, ‘The Fantastic Quest.’ Is it one, though? Let’s find out.

For the purposes of this review, we’ll spend time with the first half dozen tracks in the collection. It is nine tracks, though. ‘Calamine’ opens up the album with a sound similar to what I discovered last year with Underlined Passages – very sharply executed with slick production. The melodic tune is a fantastic opener, an easy-breezing jaunt through jingly pop musings and snappy percussion.

‘Arabesque’ is, in my opinion, where the effort starts to get interesting. The song has a bit more pep in its step, and I especially like the soft-spoken electric guitar riffs that orchestrate the atmosphere behind the vocals. The falsetto choruses are lovely. The album art for the collection is a washed out, surreal day at the beach. Tracks like ‘Arabesque’ embody that imagery very well.

‘Everyone Was There’ is reminiscent of a comparison I actually made last year. I argued that Underlined Passages’ sound is akin to the Wombats, or some of the themes Modest Mouse has toyed with in the past. I think ‘Everyone Was There’ truly sounds like a track off the cutting room floor of an early Wombats pursuit. The lyricism, while a tad shallow, is definitely succinctly penned on tracks like ‘Everyone Was There.’

That may be my only quip with Underlined Passages. They occupy a very catchy, infectious atmosphere that lends itself well to pop themes. At times, that does mean that their lyricism suffers catchiness for depth. ‘Rearview Blue’ digs into some existential, self-aware territory that I like, perhaps breaking out of that box. ‘The Driver,’ while one of the most upbeat and dance-worthy tracks, definitely doesn’t.

I can’t necessarily count that against Underlined Passages, though. They play to their audience and their strengths very well. I sincerely hope they do branch into some weightier lyricism at some point, however. ‘Broke Up With Your Friends’ actually hints at the band attempting to do that. It’s a fairly emotional track, and separates itself from the other five before it.

‘The Fantastic Quest’ is a mighty endeavor – though I do long for some further depth in the band’s explorations. That said, it’s an exciting piece of new music worth checking out on April 5.

http://www.underlineslove.com

https://www.facebook.com/underlinedpassages/

JaneliaSoul – Press Release – March 24, 2016

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

PRESS RELEASE – MARCH 24, 2016

JaneliaSoul To Release New Single This April

Baltimore, MD – JaneliaSoul, a rising independent artist in the United States, is preparing to release her new studio endeavor, ‘Love-Hate.’ The new single, due out April 15, will be available on all major platforms, including retailers like iTunes and Amazon and streaming platforms like Spotify. (The release will also be available on the African music service Simfy Africa.)

JaneliaSoul was inspired to write the new tune after a spiritual journey of self-discovery in her homeland, Nigeria, West Africa. During her excursion, she learned how to come to peace with the love-hate relationship in her life. The sharply produced track elegantly combines reggae and pop musings with JaneliaSoul’s passionate and infectious personality.

“When I wrote this song, I took on the quest to translate the deep emotions I have about an inanimate object into a relationship between a man and a woman,” says JaneliaSoul. The woman in the song is her; the man is Africa.

JaneliaSoul’s multi-cultural background influences her dramatically unique and wholly diverse approach to music. With charming melodies and tactful lyricism, she has crafted a space for herself within the independent music scene unlike any other. With a mother hailing from a royal family in Nigeria and a father from America, JaneliaSoul truly represents a vast spectrum of cultural stylings in her music.

That music echoes that of Etta James, Ziggy Marley, and Sade, to mention but a few. In Africa, JaneliaSoul boasts a collection of popular hits in the afro-pop genre. Well known for tracks such as ‘Sexy Nana’ and ‘Love Song in Yoruba,’ the performer is a staple of the African independent scene. Looking to showcase her culture to new audiences in the United States, the vocalist is based in Baltimore, Maryland as she works on her full-length record.

‘Love-Hate,’ out April 15, is the first insight into that album. Follow JaneliaSoul online via her website and social networking below!

http://www.janeliasoul.com/

https://twitter.com/Janeliasoul

https://www.facebook.com/janeliafan

https://www.instagram.com/janeliasoul/

https://plus.google.com/+JaneliaAKAJaneliasoul

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5Q0b6TEwSsEVidnCmKH-IQ
 

Saphyre Rain – ‘Break The Cycle’

Independent Spotlight is a continuing series on Stewart’s blog. The series revolves around independent artists and bands sending their music to Brett to review. No band is promised a positive review, and all music is reviewed honestly in an effort to better independent music.

In this morning’s edition of the Independent Spotlight, we’re going to be shining our gaze on Saphyre Rain, an independent outfit that has just released their debut studio endeavor, an EP entitled ‘Break The Cycle.’ The five-song EP is a well-produced, rather interesting jaunt through independent rock with a unique flair. Let’s dig right into it and figure out what it’s all about.

Saphyre Rain carries themselves differently than most rock outfits. Their masthead isn’t a self-promotion, it’s a link to suicide prevention helplines that are open twenty-four-seven. Austin and Amanda Harras, a husband and wife duo, have banded together with their new music to make an important statement: you’re not alone. Your pain can, more or less, be a catalyst for good.

Right off the bat, I find this approach to music, and this mission statement, very admirable. “Somebody cares,” Amanda croons over the intense, anthemic chorus of the opening track, ‘Live.’ The instrumentation is splendid, mixing hard rock bar chord rhythm with synthesizers, sharp lyricism, and atmospheric musings. My only quip is Amanda’s vocals. They’re mixed a bit too low on the louder portions of the song which causes her to be drowned out. That’s a shame, and a remix may be massively beneficial.

‘We Won’t Give Up’ is another tune that suffers similar vocal mixing issues. It may be worth mentioning that I spun the EP twice – on studio monitors and on studio headphones. In the latter, Amanda is more understandable, but it’s still an issue. Essentially, the whole EP could do with a vocal remix. Putting that aside, though, let’s talk about the other elements. ‘We Won’t Give Up’ has a particularly good set of lyrics that feel inspirational without feeling cliche.

The clear sincerity of Saphyre Rain probably keeps them from entering cliche territory. They’re tackling something they’re passionate about, not writing mindless “inspirational rock.” ‘Glow’ boasts some interesting melodies and vocal sections. There’s definitely a pop sensibility to the duo’s writing. The strongest of their endeavors, however, is most certainly the lovely ‘My Heaven.’ The song is simply gorgeous. It’s exceptional instrumentation and heartfelt lyricism makes it the centerpiece of the album.

Then, ‘Come Back’ closes out the album with a pretty bombastic, hard rocking note. I love how concrete the production is, perhaps with the exception of that low vocal mix. Saphyre Rain creates a very full landscape. Their music doesn’t just occupy that landscape well, it dominates it, and every piece fits together in a fairly masterful, genre-bending puzzle. It’s a joyful sound of rock and roll and good vibrations set to harsh tones typically reserved for angst and frustration.

‘Break The Cycle’ will hopefully help people. It’s not just an album to be enjoyed, it’s an album a great many of us live. Depression, anxiety, and mental illness are very real realities. Music is one of the finest ways to connect with humans – it’s the universal language. As cliche as that sounds, it’s true. I’ll never forget Bob Dylan’s ‘Time Out Of Mind’ getting me through my first serious break-up. I could see ‘Break The Cycle’ helping someone in a hard situation, too. Check it out below.

www.saphyrerain.com

www.facebook.com/saphyrerain.com

www.twitter.com/saphyrerain.com

www.soundcloud.com/saphyre-rain

New Day Revolution – ‘The American Dream Is A Lie’

Independent Spotlight is a continuing series on Stewart’s blog. The series revolves around independent artists and bands sending their music to Brett to review. No band is promised a positive review, and all music is reviewed honestly in an effort to better independent music.

In this morning’s edition of the Independent Spotlight, we’re going to be shining our gaze on New Day Revolution, a band that’s been lauded as an “awesome wake-up call to the Detroit music scene.” The four-piece hard rock outfit has recently released an EP entitled ‘The American Dream Is A Lie.’ Do the new tunes stand up against the buzz they’re generating in their local scene? Let’s dig right in and find out.

I don’t do a whole lot of hard rock and/or metal content here on the Spotlight. While I admit it isn’t my personal favorite type of music, that isn’t the reason we don’t showcase it often. It’s because there isn’t a lot of it being recorded and distributed to press like myself on the internet. It’s an indie scene that, while active, remains fairly underground and doesn’t have an output comparable to other genres.

Thus, New Day Revolution has a step up on the competition right away. How is the music, though? Well, it’s definitely hard rocking. ‘Bury It Down’ opens up the album with impressive gusto, exhibiting some of the strongest, and weakest, aspects of the outfit. The lead guitar and percussion banter are splendid – the riffs are wholly interesting and I love the thunderous drummer. The feedback tinged guitar solo on the latter half of the track is fantastic.

The lead vocalist, Dakota Starr, is a bit hit and miss. At times, his growls sound less ‘hard rock’ and more ‘South Park character.’ I will concede, though, that he is ill-mixed, and that likely doesn’t do him fair justice. He’s completely overpowered in ‘Demon in You,’ a tune that’s otherwise quite strong. ‘Judas’ amends this, to an extent, and I actually think his rapport with the band on that track is inherently stronger, too.

The Achilles’ heel of New Day Revolution is their production. I think ‘Rattlesnake’ is the best produced track of the bunch – the instruments are a bit more separated in their levels, giving them breathing room. The EP feels very muddy. The vocals are often too soft and the low-end on each of the masters is drastic. Listening to the album in a studio on professional monitors, I had to kick my bass levels down because it was so overpowering.

That production faux pas makes me think that this may have either been self-recorded, or recorded in a semi-live scenario. ‘The American Dream Is A Lie’ has a tendency to sound like an enthusiastic fan bootleg more than it does a professional studio endeavor. That may also hold some charm for some listeners, though. When it’s all said and done, though, the pieces fit together pretty nicely and their output is very promising. I’d love to see them progress this year into more territory.

www.newdayrevolutionband.com

www.facebook.com/newdayrevolution

www.reverbnation.com/newdayrevolution

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDFxB3wvmxtWF1Cbq_ZMW8A

Blak Pope – Press Release – March 18, 2016

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

PRESS RELEASE – MARCH 18, 2018

Blak Pope Has An Announcement: Judgement Day Is Over

Blak Pope, a rising independent hip hop artist in Seattle, is sending a message to the masses that judgement day is finally over. His new single, ‘My Own Life,’ dropped on Feb. 29 to significant acclaim from fans. Now, on April 3, Blak Pope will be debuting the accompanying music video for the new tune.

‘My Own Life’ is a song of self-independence, according to Blak Pope. “It’s a song I wrote basically because I have been judged almost my entire existence,” says the artist. “I got tired of pretending to be who I am not.” The new single liberates the listener, reminding them that you don’t need to face rejection for what you do, where you’re from, what you wear, or the life choices you make.

‘My Own Life’ challenges those who would set judgement upon you by asking simply, “Why you mad, bro?” The song gets in the face of those that would impose their unnecessary judgement upon others for just being themselves. If someone isn’t hurting you by following their own path, then why block it with ill-will and hostility?

Originally from Cameroon, West Africa, Blak Pope has always been heavily inspired by American hip hop. Now, as he resides in Seattle, Washington, Blak Pope has made an indelible mark on the independent industry as more than your typical hip hop artist. He’s a master of of party hip hop, and he’s got a unique talent for getting clubs bumping with some of the sharpest produced club songs around.

‘My Own Life’ is a first insight into ‘Breaking News,’ Blak Pope’s upcoming debut full-length album. The endeavor will include several collaborations with well-known hip hop artists from the Seattle scene. The music video for ‘My Own Life’ will drop April 3!

Blak Pope’s music is released via Big Talk Records.

BigTalkRecords.com

SoundCloud.com/BlakPope

Facebook.com/BlakPopeMusic

Contact:

blakpope1984@gmail.com | 206-818-2107

Kiya Heartwood – ‘Palo Duro’

Independent Spotlight is a continuing series on Stewart’s blog. The series revolves around independent artists and bands sending their music to Brett to review. No band is promised a positive review, and all music is reviewed honestly in an effort to better independent music.

In this morning’s edition of the Independent Spotlight, we shine our gaze on Kiya Heartwood, an award winning independent music veteran who’s recently dropped her latest studio endeavor, ‘Palo Duro.’ The singer songwriter’s flair for roots rock, folk, and country musings is particularly refreshing because of its remarkable authenticity. ‘Palo Duro’ is an album that embraces a grassroots style that is so missing in the indie scene right now. Let’s explore the new album.

It’s worth immediately noting that I spun ‘Palo Duro’ twice through in-studio on monitors. The production is very good. It’s simplistic, yes, but Heartwood is elegantly accented amidst very complimentary soundscapes of traditional instrumentation, and later on, edgier rock compositions. Often times in the indie scene artists struggle with this type of production. Everything on ‘Palo Duro,’ however, fits into itself nicely to create a pretty full portrait – no mastering problems or ill-organized mixes.

That portrait is very American. This is traditional Americana at its best in the scene right now. While the opening track, ‘Icarus,’ is perfectly pleasant, the titular track that follows is especially good. The atmospheric, reverberated space that Heartwood creates is reminiscent of Bob Dylan’s ‘Man in the Long Black Coat,’ with its raw harmonica sections and sharp lyricism. If the record exhibits anything, it’s that Heartwood is a strong storyteller. That’s her most admirable quality.

I’d argue there are other flairs to the album as well. ‘Mirage,’ for example, has hints of Latin influence scattered throughout. The nylon string classical guitar and hand percussion are very well performed – she’s got a strong backing outfit. It’s a stark contrast to the steel-stringed ‘Palo Duro.’ ‘Ferris Wheel’ then makes another jump, offering a soft spoken, introspective jaunt.

I was a bit worried that this album would fall victim to the same issue a lot of rootsy indie records do – being too long. At ten tracks, it’s a meaty offering that I was worried would get bogged down in repetitious stylings or lyricism. Surprisingly, however, each of the ten tunes is quite apt for inclusion.

Within her own genre niche, Heartwood actually carves out different subsets of styles. Take ‘Fame and Fortune.’ The upbeat tune sounds like it’s straight out of Nashville. Then, you hit ‘White Flag,’ one of my personal favorites on the effort, and you’re greeted with soft, but edgy electric guitar that dances about with rhythm guitar in an anthemic way.

The best track of the latter half of ‘Palo Duro’ may very well be ‘End of the War.’ Completing an electric evolution that was hinted at on ‘White Flag,’ the track hosts some electric guitar musings that are borderline bluesy. Heartwood’s lyricism is at her strongest, too, as she croons, “I never really understood what we were fighting for.”

As the record progresses, Heartwood’s musical themes actually become more rock oriented and more contemporary. This is very good – it gives her some basis in a modern scene that then accentuates her traditional structures. ‘Burial Ground’ is one of the more punchy tracks on the album, an exhibition of gritty, Texan-style rock. ‘Perfect’ then offers a ballad-esque excursion through similar territory.

To close out the album, Heartwood fittingly returns to the traditional stylings of the former half of the collection. ‘Veinte Anos’ directly delves into that Latin/Spanish influence toyed with on ‘Mirage.’ It’s actually a duet with a male vocalist in Spanish set to a sweeping classical guitar. It’s one hell of a closer, and a statement of immense versatility.

Kiya Heartwood genuinely excites me. As a deep lover of traditional Americana, blues, folk, and other similar avenues of music, I see Heartwood as a breath of fresh air amidst a scene very preoccupied with far less genuine endeavors. (A lot of the Americana that comes across my desk is indie rock with an acoustic guitar at best.) This is the real thing. Spin it below!

https://soundcloud.com/kiya-heartwood/sets/palo-duro

www.kiyaheartwood.com

Vore Aurora – Their Two New Tunes

Independent Spotlight is a continuing series on Stewart’s blog. The series revolves around independent artists and bands sending their music to Brett to review. No band is promised a positive review, and all music is reviewed honestly in an effort to better independent music.

In this evening’s edition of the Independent Spotlight, we’ll be digging into Vore Aurora, a band from Alameda, California. The trio, which consists of A’Lizzabeth Barrett on vocals, Jonah Phillips on synthesizers and drums, and Clinton Maney on guitar, is an eclectic outfit, to say the least. Their two new singles, both of which were released within the last month, concrete the act as one with incredible potential within the indie community. Let’s explore their new tunes.

Tags on Vore Aurora’s music consist of genres like ‘electronic dark-wave,’ ‘’ethereal,’ and ‘synth-pop.’ All of those are adequate, and in honesty, their music is a dynamic mix of them all. Take ‘Carmine,’ their first single. It’s a compelling jaunt through atmospheric instrumentation and moody, shadowed vocal delivery. The synthesizer and percussion banter is very thick and doused in reverb. I adore the cascading, eerie guitar musings in the backdrop of the mix.

That mix is quite excellent, too. At times, Barrett is a bit difficult to understand, but all things considered, the mixing and mastering of ‘Carmine’ stands tall against its independent counterparts. It doesn’t feel overproduced, either, which is refreshing considered synthesizers and reverb can easily fall victim to that.

‘Null Plus Void,’ which dropped on March 1, explores the landscapes of ‘Carmine’ in far greater aural detail. The track is more aggressive, but in a good way. ‘Carmine’ feels subdued and subtle. ‘Null Plus Void’ feels almost accusatory, creating a feeling of urgency and impending darkness. Barrett holds magnificent power over the outfit, masterfully moving in and out of the erratic atmosphere with tact and grace. I love the heavier use of synthesizers, too, especially since they still feel properly produced and executed.

‘Carmine’ and ‘Null Plus Void’ showcase that Vore Aurora has the ability to harness their niche well while expanding within it. The dichotomy between the two tracks is intriguing, and offers up the notion that Vore Aurora probably has countless directions they could venture next. It’s a promising endeavor, one worth definitely spinning. Check them out below!

http://voreaurora.com/

http://voreaurora.bandcamp.com/

https://soundcloud.com/Vore-Aurora

https://www.facebook.com/voreaurora

https://www.instagram.com/voreaurora/