Reflected Illusions – ‘Radio Waves’

Independent Spotlight is a continuing series on Stewart’s blog. The series revolves around independent artists and bands sending their music to Brett to review. No band is promised a positive review, and all music is reviewed honestly in an effort to better independent music.

In this morning’s edition of the Independent Spotlight, we shine our gaze on Reflected Illusions, the moniker of a musician named Rez hailing from Toronto. For nearly nine years now he’s been working on different iterations of the project which is designed to expand the usage of electronic music through compellingly new and experimental techniques. His latest release is ‘Radio Waves,’ an endeavor partly scored with Morse code and voices from NASA.

As you may suspect, ‘Radio Waves’ is centered around a sonic palette of cosmic musings and ideas. The galactic tracks are caked with a generous use of reverb and call upon a wide array of synthesizers to craft their experiences. This is, for the most part, enjoyable and effective. It’s very easy with synthesizers to accidentally fall off the deep end. Reflection Illusions’ synthesizers are sublime and surreal, thus manifesting themselves into a pleasant musical environment that isn’t weighed down in cliche.

‘Radio Waves,’ the title track and opening of the record, establishes the sound the listener will be immersing themselves in throughout the half dozen tracks. I love the layering of sounds; the technological quips are so elegantly contrasted by the synthesizer lead and sparse, but tactful beats. ‘Moons of Jupiter’ is very similar in this regard, but I’d argue the track falters in some spots due to its length. The track doesn’t offer enough meat on its bone to constitute a five and a half minute excursion. It’s most certainly a lovely track, though.

‘Ready for Launch’ is an entirely surreal experience, one that is perfectly accented by the NASA samples on the latter half of its run. I love Reflected Illusions’ use of these audio files. NASA periodically releases collections of audio, a good deal of which was actually released quite recently. Since it’s a government agency, the content isn’t protected in any way. (Similar to using old recordings of the Marine Band, for example.) The recordings obviously aren’t musical in nature. Seeing an artist like Reflected Illusions use them is wonderful.

The opposite half of the record offers a bit more intensity and pep in its step. ‘Solar System and Beyond,’ for example, offers a much wider variety of samples, synthesizers, and intensified soundscapes. Because of this, the track bodes better than ‘Moons of Jupiter’ did, and it’s even longer. The NASA-laden ‘Greetings to the Universe’ is the same; it’s a five minute track that offers the most unique listening experience.

‘Zero Gravity’ offers the harshest synthesizers and beats on the album. The track pulls it off, though, and it’s a perfect finale that contrasts itself especially well against where you began with the titular tune. ‘Radio Waves’ is a journey, one very much worth taking due to its successful experimental nature and fascinating tracks.

www.reflectedillusions.net

https://reflectedillusions.bandcamp.com/album/radio-waves

Athmoss – ‘Father’ (Piano Version)

Independent Spotlight is a continuing series on Stewart’s blog. The series revolves around independent artists and bands sending their music to Brett to review. No band is promised a positive review, and all music is reviewed honestly in an effort to better independent music.

In this evening’s edition of the Independent Spotlight, I delve into Imre Meszaros’ latest tune, ‘Father.’ The independent singer songwriter works under the moniker of Athmoss, so I’ll refer to him as such throughout this piece. The track, performed entirely by Athmoss, is a tribute to his late father who passed away last year. Let’s talk about the song, and in particular, the ‘piano version’ of the release.

‘Father’ boasts stunningly beautiful instrumentation, something that accents Athmoss absolutely wonderfully. The creative decision to have sparse, but elegant instrumentation was the right one. Aside from a few sporadic string sections that rise and fall in harmony, the piece is performed entirely on piano. This leaves Athmoss in the center and focus of the piece. With such a personal, emotional tune, this was the proper composition and production choice for a variety of reasons.

Athmoss’ lyricism begins as simplistic as his instrumentation: gone are the carefree days of youth. With them, adulthood has been a bit of a mixed bag. Athmoss introspectively muses about the kind of man he is and wants to be, but remains resolute in the idea that his father was a great one. Athmoss attributes his father for inspiring him, introducing him to music, and carrying him through hard times. It’s touching, and Athmoss handles the subject matter so well, which is great, because these tracks can have their heart in the right place and still come out riddled in cliche.

Fathers, mothers, and eventual fatherhood and motherhood have produced some of the greatest songs ever. From Paul McCartney and John Lennon musing about their mothers in ‘Let it Be’ and ‘Julia’ to a modern day Kanye West partnering with the former to write a song about his own fatherhood, ‘Only One,’ parents and the act of becoming one prove poignant subject matter. Athmoss’ take on honoring his father is admirable and well executed, extending a legacy of soft, loving takes on parents in song.

http://www.athmossmusic.com/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ptv8aY016Nk
https://soundcloud.com/athmoss/father-piano-version
https://www.facebook.com/Athmoss
https://twitter.com/athmossmusic

LAKOTAH – ‘Heaven’s Own’

Independent Spotlight is a continuing series on Stewart’s blog. The series revolves around independent artists and bands sending their music to Brett to review. No band is promised a positive review, and all music is reviewed honestly in an effort to better independent music.

In this evening’s edition of the Independent Spotlight, we shine our gaze on an independent “electro-rock” artist, LAKOTAH. The Los Angeles based artist is signed to BooBoo Records and has a nice following online, something that has surely blossomed out of her award winning work in their area. Her latest studio endeavor is ‘Heaven’s Own,’ an intensely psychedelic number soaked in reverb and peculiarity. I’ll put the video below, because I’d argue it’s very important to the piece. Go ahead and check it out, and then read on.

As you’re coming down from your music video induced LSD trip, let’s dig into ‘Heaven’s Own’ on a musical level. It’s a very well produced track, utilizing some erratic, but surprisingly lovely instrumentation. A cello, cataclysmic electric guitar riffs, synthesizers, and electronic beats drive the song forward with epic force. The entire mix is well organized, too, which is as unique as it is refreshing. Typically, when independent acts envelope themselves in such grand soundscapes, their productions suffer all sorts of technical issues. (Poor mixing, bad micing, etc.) LAKOTAH has a firm hold over her sound, and as a result, ‘Heaven’s Own’ is a masterful and controlled manipulation of it.

Lyrically, the piece is scattered with sparse, dramatic, and vague imagery. It reminds me a bit of a Led Zeppelin track with an extra dose of psychedelic sound. That archaic Babylonian imagery is very ‘Battle of Evermore’-esque. LAKOTAH dominates the space that she occupies hauntingly; she has quite the set of chops and her delivery is wholly emotional and authentic. In fact, the combination of those tactful lead vocals and the exceptional instrumentalists makes LAKOTAH a concoction of beauty and intrigue – the act is unlike much else in the indie scene right now.

I’m not even going to pretend I truly know what is going on in that music video. It’s bizarre, a bit kitschy, and way over my head. If LAKOTAH was going for the late 60s flair, she’s definitely achieved it. Despite the ridiculous stock imagery of ruins and pyramids superimposed over cookie cutter video effects, the video’s content is oddly fitting for the song. The kitschiness is actually endearing.

‘Heaven’s Own’ is a great tune with a lot of meat on its bone. I particularly like how put together LAKOTAH is. She’s talented and she has great production to showcase that. She’ll also have a new single dropping soon entitled ‘Soldier’s Song,’ so keep tabs for that!

www.lakotahmusic.com

www.facebook.com/lakotahfans

www.reverbnation.com/lakotah

www.twitter.com/lakotah

https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/lakotah/id1031349644

Young A.G – ‘Sight To See’

Independent Spotlight is a continuing series on Stewart’s blog. The series revolves around independent artists and bands sending their music to Brett to review. No band is promised a positive review, and all music is reviewed honestly in an effort to better independent music.

If I had a dollar for every teenage hip hop act I’ve received here for the Independent Spotlight, well, I could probably stop writing the Independent Spotlight. (Or anything else, for that matter.) I get inundated on a near-daily basis by young artists striving to be the next Kanye, the next Eminem, or the next ‘Real O.G.’ More often than not, I let them down easy, and critique their blatant narcissism and shoddy work. Young A.G, a sixteen year-old hip hop songwriter from Northern Virginia, however, doesn’t elicit that response. He’s actually quite good and shows a lot of promise. Let’s take a look at his new tune, ‘Sight To See.’

Right out of the gate: the best part of ‘Sight To See’ is that Young A.G isn’t egotistical. That’s vitally important in regard to his authenticity; if he was going on about how he’s the next “real O.G” over a Garageband preset, I wouldn’t give him the time of day. He’s optimistic and driven, but his lyrics don’t come across as self-indulging. Instead, he acknowledges his youth, looks toward the future, and recognizes the industry’s pull to change him into something he doesn’t want to be. ‘Sight To See’ rebels against that; it’s actually a statement of freedom and A.G even muses about how he’s not a gangster, he’s an emcee.

Everything Young A.G produces is entirely ‘do it yourself.’ He’s not recording in a professional studio, nor is anyone else involved in the production. I found this particularly impressive because A.G’s production is actually quite sharp. It’s catchy, well produced, and the beats, while simplistic, are wholly original. I even love his monotone meanderings in the choruses – there is something so genuine about his persona. I dig that.

Young A.G is the kind of artist that every single teenage hip hop artist that comes across my desk should strive to be like. He’s ambitious, but not narcissistic. Talented, but not ostentatious or overzealous. Even his music video is very well shot for his age, though it does play like an early 90s MTV video, cheesy transitions, plaid shirts and all. That’s okay, though. This is a remarkably good tune for a sixteen year old. I get artists thrice his age who aren’t as developed.

Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/youngagofficial
Facebook: facebook.com/youngagofficial
Twitter: twitter.com/youngagofficial

Sean McMorris – ‘Elevated Man’

Independent Spotlight is a continuing series on Stewart’s blog. The series revolves around independent artists and bands sending their music to Brett to review. No band is promised a positive review, and all music is reviewed honestly in an effort to better independent music.

In this morning’s edition of the Independent Spotlight, we shine our gaze on Sean McMorris, a relatively green artist who has just released his sophomore studio endeavor, ‘Elevated Man.’ The well-produced jaunt through folk and classic rock musings is a refreshing one, which is largely in part to his cohesive backing. He’s got a very full band backing him along with a solid producer. This is very nice, because sometimes independent artists get buried by the DIY nature of their work. Sean McMorris is untethered by that on this album, and as a result, the productions are clean and enjoyable.

When I first began spinning the album, I had to double-take when clicking the title track to make sure my Robyn Hitchcock playlist wasn’t still playing. Quite seriously, McMorris’ vocal style is eerily similar to Hitchcock’s. In fact, his musical and lyrical styles are too, and if someone was to ask me what ‘Elevated Man’ sounds most like, I’d point them in the direction of Robyn Hitchcock. That atmospheric, erratic imagery of people floating in lawn chairs is just lovely. I love songwriters that find ways to incorporate bizarre imagery: how would you put a lawn chair into a singer songwriter tune? Exactly.

‘Lay Down’ has some fine exhibitions of instrumental prowess, something that is most definitely a mainstay on the record. The slide guitars provide a nice country swing to the singer songwriter style of McMorris, but it’s definitely rooted in pop stylings. ‘Bent Out of Shape’ is the best track of the opening of the album, eclipsing the titular tune with its dynamic, infectiously catchy electric guitar riffs and organ sections. The soft-spoken ‘Unspoken’ follows with a somber, surprisingly emotional track. I love the synthesizer solo at the end.

That synthesizer, the steel guitars, and several other instrumental instances are indicative of something that I think is very important about ‘Elevated Man.’ McMorris breaks the monotony of your typical singer songwriter record with intriguing instrumental solos and varied techniques. This is immensely beneficial to the record because I can’t tell you how many times I’ve reviewed a singer songwriter here on the Spotlight and been left with the same critique: it just gets repetitive and boring. These artists walk a fine line between monotony and creativity. McMorris walks on the latter due to his sharp production work.

‘Sweet Sarah Ruth’ and ‘Peace of Mind’ offer up some very soft territory that does wander and meander a bit. With that said, ‘Peace of Mind’ has an elegantly good chorus, and it sets the stage well for the excellent ‘Whirlwind.’ I love the minor key choruses of ‘Whirlwind;’ they create a poignantly powerful statement after the sublime ‘Peace of Mind’ and ‘Sweet Sarah Ruth’ recordings. ‘You Can Run’ is akin to the sounds of the title track and ‘Lay Down,’ which is a nice sonic return-to-form in the final several tracks of the record. Again, the highlight of ‘You Can Run’ is the instrumentation; I dig those riffs and guitar solos.

Unlike its namesake, ‘Broken Glass’ is incredibly smooth and easy going. It’s the best ‘soft song’ on the record, textured out fantastically with the steel guitar and crooning lead vocals. Lyrically, the vast majority of ‘Elevated Man’ deals with the end of a relationship. ‘Broken Glass’ is melancholy in this regard, not particularly finding any resolution as it refers to the heartbreaking thoughts as “friendly fire” on the soul. That’s powerful, though. ‘Tis,’ the finale, does have that sense of resolution, however, and thus, it’s an apt way to close out the collection.

Yes, ‘Elevated Man’ does meander at times, and it may have been a better eight or nine track experience. That said, McMorris’ creative decisions throughout mark him as one of the more talented and innovative voices in his genre in the indie scene right now. ‘Elevated Man’ is an exceptionally good singer songwriter effort riddled with pop, rock, and folk influences. It’s very much worth your time if singer songwriter music floats your boat. Check it out on BandCamp below.

http://seanmcmorris.bandcamp.com/album/elevated-man

http://www.seanmcmorris.com

http://www.twitter.com/Sean_McMorris

http://www.facebook.com/seanmcmorrismusic

http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjrO4bn5Jr0hzvqSqX81K_Q

http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/seanmcmorris2

A New Nowhere – ‘Dark Place’

Independent Spotlight is a continuing series on Stewart’s blog. The series revolves around independent artists and bands sending their music to Brett to review. No band is promised a positive review, and all music is reviewed honestly in an effort to better independent music.

In this evening’s edition of the Independent Spotlight, we shine our gaze on A New Nowhere, a new indie outfit endeavoring to revitalize the metal, alternative, and grunge rock sound in the scene. Their latest single, ‘Dark Place,’ is the first follow-up to their debut 2015 EP. They describe themselves as “energetic, heavy, melodic, and atmosphere,” taking inspirations from an array of bands they admire to craft their own authentic sound. Do they do so, or do they fall into the pitfalls many acts akin to their own do? Let’s dig into the new song and find out.

First of all, what exactly are those pitfalls? Well, independent hard rock acts have a tendency to struggle with production. This is a recurring issue throughout the independent realm, but acts with a lot of loud, distorted sound often struggle to create cohesive final masters. This is especially problematic for unsigned outfits like A New Nowhere. Fortunately, they don’t drive their tour bus right into that pothole. ‘Dark Place,’ is for the most part, very well executed.

A word to the wise: the first ten seconds of ‘Dark Place’ are mixed pretty low. Don’t turn your speakers up, unless you want to be like me, a man blown away by his monitors with a cacophony of rock and roll right at that ten second marker. That’s actually the only problematic production issue with the entire track, and it’s really only an issue because I could see it being a painful one for earbud listeners. That aside, the lead vocals are well mixed, the guitars are well performed, and the atmosphere broods and grows with wonderful tact.

The lead vocals have a tiny bit of a Pearl Jam / Eddie Vedder vibe to them. If the grunge or metal tags on this track are a deterrent to you, fear not, because I’d argue it’s much more within the realm of alternative and hard rock. In fact, it’s so pleasant, that its pleasantness may be my only issue with it. It feels a bit safe. A New Nowhere doesn’t sound like their forging new territory for themselves. I’ve heard this music time and time again, and there wasn’t a moment in ‘Dark Place’ that caused me to reel back and double-take. Exceptional music needs that ‘it’ factor.

‘Dark Place’ is a good track, and I think its indicative of an equally good band. I would like, however, for it to be a foot in the door toward something more original. A New Nowhere has incredible potential, but I do think their new single plays every piece on the board very close to home. They owe it to themselves to be musically adventurous. Most independent acts don’t have the production chops they do. (Or the instrumental chops to match, I should add.) For now, though, it isn’t a half bad start.

Konstantinos Dilzas – ‘Petra Ki Efhi’

Independent Spotlight is a continuing series on Stewart’s blog. The series revolves around independent artists and bands sending their music to Brett to review. No band is promised a positive review, and all music is reviewed honestly in an effort to better independent music.

In this evening’s edition of the Independent Spotlight, we shine our gaze on Konstantinos Dilzas and his latest studio endeavor, ‘Petra Ki Efhi.’ The new tune has an array of other contributors, so let’s get them addressed right out of the gate. The track features vocals by Sofia Arvaniti, arrangement, music, and lyrics by Dimitris Kiklis, and accordion performed by Jim Papadamis. It’s a Latin track, and it’s an acclaimed one, too, since its landed quite highly on the international and US iTunes Latin charts. (#81 and #56 respectively.) Let’s dig right into the song.

I should establish a key point from the get-go: I only speak English. Thus, the international tongues in this track are lost on me, so I can’t accurately delve into the full lyricism of the track. I do know, however, that the song is about “two people disappointed from their past lives, who met suddenly and decided to throw a stone at their past and make a wish to live the rest of their lives together.” It’s apparently a true story as well. Despite not understanding the vocals, though, I can vouch for Dilzas’ and Arvaniti’s vocal performances. They accent each other beautifully and both have an elegant set of chops perfect for this type of music.

What is this type of music, then? Well, it’s very accordion dominated, thanks to Papadamis’ contribution. Its Latin flair is hauntingly beautiful, jaunting through the instrumentation with remarkable tact. The full backing band is extraordinarily good as well, crafting a sound that feels wholly authentic and contemporary, all while managing to pay perfect homage to its Latin roots. I am disappointed that Arvaniti is so buried in the mix of the track, though. ‘Petra Ki Efhi’ would have been even more powerful if she and Dilzas traded off verses or lines rather than her softly crooning behind him. Her presence is wonderful, yes, but it does feel strong-armed out of the picture, even for a ‘featured artist’ role.

Dilzas, a naval architect and marine engineer, has a deep knowledge of Greek discography from the 1970s onward, something that is a catalyst for him pursuing some musical projects outside of his work. As a result of this, his own catalog is quite diverse, showcasing a variety of Greek, Spanish, and other influences. This coming year, he’s slated to release a collection entitled ‘INE KI EKINA TA PROINA,’ an electronic/house record based on his poems. That’s pretty darn cool, and so is ‘Petra Ki Efhi.’ Give it a spin.

https://play.spotify.com/album/65WurxtwimkuAGW3BdTsfc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g-1esg6zXa0

Blak Gondi Musik – Press Release – January 18, 2016

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

PRESS RELEASE – JANUARY 18, 2016

Blak Gondi Musik Releases New Mixtape, ‘Late Nights & Good Memories’

Alphonzo Jones, an aspiring independent music producer, has released his debut effort ‘Late Nights & Good Memories’ under the moniker of Blak Gondi Musik. The twenty-five year old producer’s instrumental endeavor clocks in at a hefty eleven tracks, and throughout its runtime, Blak Gondi Musik wants to represent the sound of New Jersey. His elegant portrayal of his city is chock-full of hip hop, soul, jazz, R&B, and pop influence.

The mixtape has what Blak Gondi Musik describes as a “chill lounge feel.” This is widely due to the subject matter on which ‘Late Nights & Good Memories’ is based. The record is a musical chronology of late night time events and social outings in Jersey. The creative process and production of the album was executed by Blak Gondi Musik. Like nearly every other producer, however, he did sample certain bits of instrumentation and old school melodies. Inspired by the likes of Kanye West, Kid Cudi, Lupe Fiasco, and A$AP Rocky, Blak Gondi Musik’s musical lineage is impressively versed, and ‘Late Nights & Good Memories’ attempts to carve out his own space within it.

The album isn’t entirely without vocals. Hailing from Orlando, Florida,  rising artist Alexa Ortiz provides an eclectic vocal performance on the fifth track, ‘Special.’ Beautifully mixed with Blak Gondi Musik’s productional prowess, Ortiz’s showcase on the record is one of the defining moments in the collection.

“I love being humble and I love to learn,” Blak Gondi Musik said. “That’s how I came up with my stage name.” The south Jersey native’s new record can be picked up via BandCamp and fans can follow both Jones and Ortiz on SoundCloud. (All of which can be found below.) ‘Late Nights & Good Memories’ is available now.

https://blakgondimusik.bandcamp.com

https://soundcloud.com/blakgondimusik

https://soundcloud.com/alexaortiz-1

Silver Circle – ‘EDM Mix #1’

Independent Spotlight is a continuing series on Stewart’s blog. The series revolves around independent artists and bands sending their music to Brett to review. No band is promised a positive review, and all music is reviewed honestly in an effort to better independent music.

In this morning’s Independent Spotlight, we’re going to be delving into some territory that’s rather foreign for this website: an EDM mix. I’ve covered quite a bit of electric dance music here on the site, but I haven’t, however, dug deep into an extensive track that acts as its own mixtape. As is the case with Silver Circle’s latest release, ‘EDM Mix #1.’ The seventeen and a half minute mix has exploded online, with hundreds of thousands of spins between YouTube and SoundCloud. Is it any good? Let’s dig right into it.

Silver Circle is a rather enigmatic artist – if you search his social networking, you’ll find scarce information and not a lot of ‘likers’ or ‘followers.’ This will probably change, because he has exploded so much online. This explosion doesn’t necessarily surprise me, either, since the EDM community is vast, especially on the internet. This incredible presence has deemed the mix exceptional. They aren’t wrong.

‘EDM Mix #1’ is absolutely perfect for club DJ’s. Hell, Silver Circle has done their job for them, and they can easily put on this mix and sit back with a cold one for nearly twenty minutes. Silver Circle’s mix is often an adaption of an array of other works from the likes of AWOL Nation and Macklemore. That said, the producer does a fine job not sitting back and letting the hits progress the piece forward; it does experiment with a variety of soundscapes to great success. The key to good EDM is taking that time to be something extraordinary. All too often EDM producers, especially in the indie scene, get lazy and their tracks become jaunts through cliche and predictable tropes. Silver Circle hasn’t done this, and you’ll find yourself moving between pop, soul, hip hop, and a whole slew of other genres through his mix.

If I had one quip with this track, it’s that it does get a bit predictable with some of its music choices. It’s 2016, can we lay ‘Soulja Boy’ to a much needed, permanent rest? Other than that, Silver Circle has created a tactful mixtape much worth your time if you’re an EDM fan, a DJ, or own a club.

The Mix: http://youtu.be/m1IekCVKm6k

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/silvercirclemusic/

Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/silvercircleDJ

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UClxTWRVCqg1xKHft_X8Y5_w/feed

SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/silver-circle

www.silvercirclemusic.com

A&L – ‘Hot Mess’

Independent Spotlight is a continuing series on Stewart’s blog. The series revolves around independent artists and bands sending their music to Brett to review. No band is promised a positive review, and all music is reviewed honestly in an effort to better independent music.

In this evening’s edition of the Independent Spotlight, we shine our gaze back on an artist that we’ve delved into numerous times in the past: A&L. The duo consists of vocalist Lana Marie and musician and producer Anthony Casuccio. In the past, I’ve lauded their ability to great well produced, accessible, and interesting rock and roll with a Nashville-style flair. Their newest studio release and endeavor is ‘Hot Fuss,’ a tune that they’ve found out has been incredible relatable to their audience. Let’s dig into it and find out why.

‘Hot Mess’ has already spent six weeks on the European PICA charts prior to its US release. It’s easy to see why when you dig into it – it’s just as well produced as their other efforts. The staple of A&L has always been, at least to me, their ability to create jingly, upbeat rock and roll that is radio-friendly and infectious, but also decent. (Typically this accessibility forgoes creativity and quality in the music industry.) ‘Hot Mess’ does this again, and its largely due to Marie’s vocal delivery. As ever, she’s so enjoyable to listen to. She’s got a great set of pipes and her personality is what sells it. Without that personality, this track would feel somewhat empty.

‘Hot Mess’ is an ode to all the misfits, rude, and disgusting people we have to deal with when attempting to find love, or even a date. I dig how it hits both ends of the spectrum – sometimes, women spend a bit too much damning men in pop music. Marie is firing at everyone! Sleazy women who flirt for a free drink, guys who unsubtly flirt and think they’re god’s gift to women, etc. Everyone has to deal with stuff like that when out in bars or clubs – A&L hits on this very well, and I absolutely get why they’ve found the tune so relatable to listeners.

Spin it below and connect with A&L online!

Watch:

https://youtu.be/XP9Ge8d3nbA

Listen:

https://soundcloud.com/buzzrecords-1/hot-mess

http://www.facebook.com/AandLmusic

http://www.twitter.com/AandLmusic